Tuesday, August 18, 2009

Warty magnificence

My Italian pumpkin foray came to a partial conclusion today, when I harvested the first "Marina di Chioggia" pumpkin. Eighteen pounds of warty loveliness. The 2" diameter stem tore some of the vine off, and I noticed that the vine had already started to put down roots, and was sad that it had been uprooted. I found some more likely spots -- one of which had already rooted -- and covered them with dirt. I'd like to save some seeds from this, which would require finding two flowers from the vine, and that might be a challenge.

I can hardly wait to hack it open and eat it!

Speaking of eating, this lovely (and not warty) melon was hiding in the foliage this morning.


Flipped over, the bottom half is quite yellow. How does one tell if it's ripe? I'm nearly certain that I'm growing a small variety, called "Picnic."


Selling winter squash to some of my family might be difficult. The watermelon, not so much.

12 comments:

Dan said...

That is one cool squash. With some butter and brown sugar baked into it I am sure the fam will love it. I think the watermelons are ripe when they easily release from the vine, I think...

Kristin said...

That is such a darling photo of you. You look so happy. You grew a beauty and canned like crazy before that.

Ribbit said...

That thing's not contagious, is it?
:)

kitsapFG said...

The "Warty Wonder"!

Here's a link with lots of info on various melons - on how to tell if they are ripe. I have always used the bottom color change, smell, size, drying down of the vine and/or tendrils, and the old thump test (sounds kind of hollow).

http://faq.gardenweb.com/faq/lists/cornucop/2002071935010165.html

Michelle said...

Oh, that is the best squash I've ever grown! It's very dense and sweet (but not too sweet) - so good. I'm envious, I haven't grown it in a few years for whatever reason. I hope you and your family like it.

Engineeredgarden said...

That is a very unusual pumpkin, and it looks wonderful! I hope it is delicious...

el said...

Well, I hope it vines back into the ground so you can attempt to save some seeds from it: I would like to be first on that seed list, please!

(Oh and my answer to the "winter squash is ick" comments in my house is "too bad." Granted I have fewer mouths to feed than you do, so...less of a chance of complaint.)

Stefaneener said...

Dan, if they would I would. Unfortunately the squash haters hate sweet squash even more, and the few of us who like it tend toward the "roasted in olive oil and salt" variety. I don't care much -- more for me, and I can always hide it in bread or pancakes. Or ravioli. . . ooooooh.

Kristin, thanks. This squash cracks me up. How can you not smile around such a monster?

Ribbit, I'll let you know!

Oh, kitsapFG, thanks! I can't tell -- they all sound alike. So I think I'm going to go with the drying test. Later. There are a few more babies in that group.

Michelle, maybe you stopped growing it because it's enormous? I'm glad to have the vote. I wandered over to Franchi semani and just drooled on the squash options. I may have to get a variety and try some different ones.

I will let you know, EG, what it ends up tasting like!

el, I'm doing my best. Between this one and the Triambe, who have decided to just wrap themselves all over each other, it's hard, but I'd like to save seeds from each. I'm going to be more organized next year. The kids don't get much choice about dinner, but my spouse doesn't like orange squashes. Go figure.

Annie's Granny said...

Stefaneener, please email me at anniebloom1 at gmail dot com.

Jackie said...

Love the warty squash! And I really like the looks of that melon. You must be further away from the ocean to grow such a beauty. I've heard they won't take the cooler marine influence.

Thomas said...

Beautiful squash! I'm envisioning a tasty creamy soup.

GP @ ABloominBlog said...

How do you cook that kind of squash?