Friday, July 30, 2010

Enchilada Sauce Forever

Beset by powdery mildew, perhaps some sort of rust, and lying almost flat on the bed, the tomatillos' time came today. Plant after plant ripped up easily and was dragged out of the garden and flung on the wheelbarrow with roots all facing one way.

For a little bit, I got some help stripping tomatillo mountain (the plants looked as though they could have grown quite a while longer, based on flowering tips and baby fruit) from a couple of kids, [no, no, not the kids -- help from the kids, tomatillos from the plants] but that didn't last long. I couldn't even get my eldest to pretend to come out and help. See if I'm an easy taxi service this week. Hmph.


I'm not sure I can blame them -- there were more than I really wanted to process, especially as the lowering sun felt more and more intense.

I was both relieved and surprised at the amount -- I had hoped to grow enough to put up a year's worth of enchilada sauce as we really like lasagne-style enchiladas, but after making a measly three pints last week, I'd despaired. Looks like there might be enough, after all.


And there are still some more to get out and pick up. Tomorrow will be time enough for that, plus a boatload of other details. That stack of bricks in the first picture would be much nicer put out as the end part of the patio. Maybe I should get some more clover seed, too.

18 comments:

Rachel said...

Our pour tomatillos have collapsed under their weight for the first time ever. Next year I think we'll have to cage them like the tomatoes. I'd love to get your enchilada sauce recipe. We eat a lot of green chili stew and usually just put a bunch of tomatillos (that we previously froze) in the food processor.

meemsnyc said...

Wow, those plants are humongous. I would love to see your enchilada recipe. Yummmmy. I love salsa verde for tomatillos.

Curbstone Valley Farm said...

Well, despite the powdery mildew and rust, it looks like you had a bumper crop anyway! I'm hoping to grow some next year when we get the other half of the garden situated. Hopefully next summer won't be so dreary, and the powdery mildew will stay away.

. . . Lisa and Robb . . . said...

Oh you're breaking my heart. Our tomatillos got off to a good start, and then just sputtered. I'll be lucky if I get three fruits our of the entire harvest.

kitsapFG said...

Yowza! That's a great haul of tomatillos! Enchiladas sound devine - especially with homemade enchilada sauce.

Kristin said...

Share your tomatillo enchilada recipe please.

I love those little green parachutes dangling from the branches, enchanting fruits.

Too bad the powdery mildew got to them already, but its been a cold summer; everyone is saying that--as you know.

Heiko said...

yes!!! me too! Recipe please!

Jan said...

What enormous plants, they look huge... unless it's due to the camera!

Mr. H. said...

The good news (orbad) is that if your tomatillos are anything like ours you won't have to plant any next year as they will voluntarily come up all over the place on their own.:) It looks like you had very nice crop of them this year.

Stefaneener said...

Rachel, that's exactly it. I think if we trellised them, they'd have been over 6'tall. They like to sprawl, I suppose, but then harvesting is a challenge unless you go the scorched earth route.

meemsnyc, I'll post it when I make the sauce. It's essentially salsa verde mildly spicy, and that's it.

CVS, yes, it was very reassuring! I don't find a correlation between wet/gray and PM; it just shows up whenever it wants. I would be willing to try a different kind of summer just once, though!

Lisa, I'm so sorry. Does it help that I got only about a dozen Elephant Heart plums and none of the red ones?

kitsapFG, and they're so versatile. Either corn tortllas or polenta; queso fresco; chicken or beans/corn, or some other filling. Easy make-ahead meal.

Kristin, are you guys getting fungal diseases up on your hill? I would think you have such great air circulation it's better.

Heiko, I'll get there.

Jan, no, they really were ridiculous. Sprawly, but a lot like a big cherry tomato plant. I think the camera diminished their hugeness some.

Mr. H., I suppose I should thank you for the warning. We're already getting such an odd collection of volunteers. . . I suppose I won't start any, but just transplant babies. There are smashed ones in the path, so I'll look there too.

Rachel said...

I've heard that if you spray your plants with water with baking soda in it, it will help prevent mildew.

BTW, how many plants did you plant? We had a large crop last year, but we went through them a lot quicker than I thought we would.

. . . Lisa and Robb . . . said...

I had a poor plum harvest, too.

I am baffled by what does well, and what struggles.

Engineeredgarden said...

I admit to not knowing the first thing about tomatillos, but you certainly have alot of them!

Jan said...

Thanks for commenting and solving the mystery of the small courgettes! I assumed that, because they began to grow, they'd been pollinated.

Daphne said...

That is a lot of tomatillos. I have only two plants this year, but I'm hoping for a good crop. Right now I'm just collecting them. I'll be processing later on. I haven't done tomatillos in a long long time and am looking forward to seeing your recipe. I could use a good one.

esperanza said...

I'm seeing your enchilada sauce forever as a really good thing. Its yummy!

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